Same but Different: Innovation and Experimentation in Desert Arts Forum

Tuesday, 5 March 2013

Key Dates:

25 March in Alice Springs

4 April in Sydney

Same but Different provides a participatory forum for comparative exchange, networking and collaboration across and between new aesthetic – same but different – desert art and media practice.

Same but Different was established in 2012 to explore the creative possibilities of desert Aboriginal art and cultural traditions, with art understood not as artefact or object but rather as a process of cultural production. Through Same but Different, desert Aboriginal artists and media practitioners showcase their work and share stories of its production with one another and a growing audience of associated collaborative arts and media researchers and practitioners.

The 2013 Same but Different forum in Alice Springs continues to support established and emerging cultural and project relationships between artists, media-makers, community art centres, independent artists, youth arts projects, media organisations, creative producers, curators, researchers and writers working across this dynamic field. Presentations will explore the conditions for the emergence of new forms and styles of Aboriginal art and why experimentation and innovation matter now

Same but Different was established in 2012 as a partnership between
CCAP/NIEA COFA UNSW and Desart, the peak body for central,
southern and western desert art centres. The initiative explores the
creative possibilities of desert Aboriginal art and cultural traditions,
with art understood not as artefact or object but rather as a process of
cultural production. Through Same but Different, desert Aboriginal artists
and media practitioners showcase their work and share stories of its
production with one another and a growing audience of associated
collaborative arts and media researchers and practitioners.
The 2013 Same but Different forum in Alice Springs continues to support
established and emerging cultural and project relationships between
artists, media-makers, community art centres, independent artists,
youth arts projects, media organisations, creative producers, curators,
researchers and writers working across this dynamic field. Presentations
will explore the conditions for the emergence of new forms and styles of
Aboriginal art and why experimentation and innovation matter now.

The full program can be viewed on the National Institute of Experimental Arts Website.






 

 

 

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